Skip to main content

About your Search

20130318
20130326
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
. sons,cided that her four and the youngest, would be better served by a per educational methods than by various public schools -- would be better served by her educational methods. i think she was right. she was remarkably gifted in rk.viding that sparked -- spa i learned to love learning because of the way she introduced me to topics. it was very chaotic, i must say. >> what was the day like? >> there was no lesson plan or curriculum standards. my mother would say, ok, what is interesting today, and some days, it would be mathematics, and we might do only mathematics for three days in a row because it was interesting, and then it would get tiresome, and she would say, let's talk about history and talk about what the significance of that event was, and she was a playwright and very interested in languages. we did a lot of study of languages, and she would say, "ok, here is a word. do you think that is derived from greek or old french or latin?" and i got pretty good at bats, and we would go to the dictionary and looking it up -- and i got pretty good at that. and we would go to the d
, and the youngest, would be -- i'm the youngest and would be better served by her educational methods than by various public schools. the family traveled around between north carolina, long island, and virginia. i think she was right. she was remarkably gifted in providing that spark. it's what you really want to see education represent. i learned to love learning because of the way she introduced me to topics. it was very chaotic, i must say. >> what was the day like? >> it was totally unpredictable. there was no lesson plan or curriculum standards. my mother would say, ok, what is interesting today, and some days, it would be mathematics, and we might do only mathematics for three days in a row because it was interesting, and then it would get tiresome, and she would say, let's talk about history and talk about what the significance of that event was, and she was a playwright and very interested in languages. we did a lot of study of languages, and she would say, "ok, here is a word. from greek or old french or latin?" and i got pretty good at that, and we would go to the unabridged dict
went. you know, i could not see you with a west point education, it has opened up a lot.it is much more of a liberal arts education now. then it was engineering and military tactics. i had no interest in that at all and i did not want a military career. >> when did you first read "witness"? >> so many years ago. i cannot remember when, probably when i was in college and after that cold friday, and i read "witness", i think three times now.my family has not to read it. with communism having waned, it will be harder for them to do it. >> so what is the big deal? >> he was a great writer, a beautiful writer, but he was a soviet spy, who ultimately rejected communism, embraced christianity, and felt the struggle in the world was not just between the soviet union and the united states, it was between communism and christianity. but of course he famously said he thought he was joining the losing side not the winning side, and then, of course, his famous clash with the state department official who he identified as the communist spy and all the liberal intelligence, and ultimately, now we know
of a liberal arts education now. then it was engineering and military tactics. i had no interest in that at all and i did not want a military career. >> when did you first read once? >> so many years ago. i cannot remember when, probably when i was in college and after that cold friday and i read on once, i think the times now. so what is the big deal. he was great writer, a beautiful writer, but he was soviet spy, who ultimately rejected communism, embraced christianity, and felt the struggle in the world was not just between the soviet union and the united states it was between communism and christianity. but of course he famously said he thought he was joining the losing side not the winning side, and then, of course, his famous clash with the state department official who he identified as the communist spy and all the liberal intelligence, and ultimately, now we know from evidence that it has come down in the last 30-40 years. chambers was right. >> you talked about your christianity in your columns. why did you write about it? when did you become a christian? eye became a christian, i grew
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)